Shock revelation: Many Muslims in Norway hate Jews

articles lifted from vårt land.no (rubbish google translate):

Need to survey Norwegian Muslim’s Jew hatred

In Bærum there recently done a survey among 500 Muslim youths about their relationship with the Jews and the State of Israel.  The youth center Marie Plathe sponsors the survey. The center has long worked with youngsters who are on their way to becoming radicalized.

The figures from the study are not yet fully analyzed, but according to manager Ikhlaque Chan shows a preliminary review that many of the Muslim youth lack knowledge about Jews, Judaism and Israel. Several also have trouble distinguishing between Judaism as a religion and Israeli politics.

No-one reports having had negative experiences with Jews and no-one said they dislike Jews.

However more respondents say  that they use “Jew” as an insult. Several also believe that there is an American-Jewish conspiracy against Muslims.

– This shows that the Muslim youths know too little about how things are interrelated, says Chan.

From anti-Semitism to Islamophobia

European Muslims are much more anti-Semitic than the general population, according to a new report. Half of the Muslim population in France, Austria and Belgium have anti-Semitic attitudes. The report was presented in Friday’s Klassekampen.

Shoaib Sultan, adviser in Anti-Racist Center, is not surprised by the findings, and reminds us that many Muslims come from countries with widespread anti-Semitic attitudes.

The report shows a study from 2013 in which Christians and Muslims in a number of European countries are asked whether you can trust Jews. 64.1 percent of Muslims in Austria answer no. In comparison, 10.7 percent of the country’s Christians say the same. In France believes 43.4 percent of Muslims that Jews are not to be trusted – compared with 7.1 percent among French Christians.

Asks for more facts

In 2012 it was made a survey that revealed that 12 percent of the population in Norway have strong prejudices against Jews. But it is never examined whether Norwegian Muslims are particularly antisemitic. Anti-Racist Center has asked that such an investigation is carried out. With specific numbers it becomes easier to recognize the problem and to take action.

Ervin Kohn, head of the Jewish community, agrees.

– For the Muslim community in Norway to deal with this, they should have a good factual basis. The authorities should help, he tells Klassekampen.

He believes the trend in Norway is similar to that elsewhere in Europe, and says the Muslim communities ought to examine their own attitudes.

Jew hatred – Islamophobia rise

Sultan in Anti-Racist Centre think-Semitic attitudes in Norway is somewhat more widespread among Muslims than in the general population.

– Will this be taken seriously in the Muslim communities?

– Many are aware that this exist, but I am unsure if and how it is being addressed, he said.

The report also shows that the anti-Semitic conspiracy beliefs are much stronger among Muslims than among the general population in Europe. 44 percent French Muslims think for example of the idea that the Zionists rule the world. In the general population the figure is 16 percent.

– It is important to get Muslims to understand that Islamophobia one sees in society today is mindset derived from anti-Semitism. Such recognition would appear that vaccination against such attitudes, says Sultan, who has also been the leader of the Islamic Council.

– Are there major differences between the Muslim communities?

– There is reasonable to assume. Attitudes from the homeland are often passed on.

Kohn fears Muslim Jew hatred in Norway

Kohn fears Muslim hatred of Jews in Norway
Half of the Muslim population in France, Austria and Belgium have anti-Semitic attitudes, according to a new report. Ervin Kohn fears that the problem is as big in Norway.

by © NTB

A report from the Institute for the Study of Global Anti-Semitism and Policy shows that European Muslims are far more anti-Semitic than most Europeans, writes the class struggle.

The report shows a study from 2013 in which Christians and Muslims in a number of European countries are asked if Jews are trustworthy. 64.1 percent of Muslims in Austria answer no.

In comparison, 10.7 percent of Austria’s Christian say the same. In France believes 43.4 percent of Muslims that Jews are not to be trusted – compared with 7.1 percent among French Christians.

Sad

– It is sad, but unfortunately not shocking,  Ervin Kohn leader of the Jewish community told the newspaper.

In 2012 it was made a survey that revealed that 12 percent of the population in Norway people have strong prejudices against Jews. But it is never examined whether Norwegian Muslims are particularly antisemitic. Kohn believes government should fund a study that addresses this.

Must tackle this among themselves

– For the Muslim community in Norway shall take hold of this, they should have a good factual basis. The authorities should help, he said.

Kohn, who have stood up against finger pointing at the Muslim minority in Europe as the cause of anti-Semitism, think anti-Semitism is more prevalent among Muslims than people in Norway.

– There is nothing to suggest that it does not apply to Norway. I miss that the Muslim communities deal with this issue, he says.

The report is based on multiple studies with a total of 40,000 respondents.

4 comments for “Shock revelation: Many Muslims in Norway hate Jews

  1. motti
    May 25, 2015 at 1:54 pm

    Well Kohn made the mistake no doubt because of Political correctness. How stupid

  2. motti
    May 27, 2015 at 3:24 am

    I finally made a trip to beautifully lansdscaped Norway and stayed with family in Buskerus. From the veranda one can see Blefjell mountain still covered in snow, as is usual even at this time of year.

    I visited the synagogue in Bergstien and arrived to find two police cars at the top of the road and an unmarked dark blue 4×4 all with armed police. Let’s hope that n the event of an attack, they can differentiate between Jews and the far extremist elements within Norwegian society. The only reason I visited the synagogue was show support and solidarity with the Jewish people in Oslo.

    The entrance to the road had concrete blocks and the entrance to the synagogue was actually to the side. I stopped at the entrance to be met with three security giuards unarmed civilians on shmera duty. I had my tallit bag with me and spoke with them. One was Israeli, another a Swede and another Norwegian. I had started speaking Norwegian then when I found out that one was actually Israeli living in Norway, I went into my almost forgotten Hebrew mode. I showed my old Israeli dog tags which went down well., as one would expect.

    Many people began to arrive and so the service began, I walked into the main hall which had not changed since my wife and I were members. Apart from a welcoming and inquisitive member who was also an Israeli the vast majority totally ignored me as a guest who in most countries would have been welcomed. So Mr Kohn, you might want to look into this.

    On the day I was there, a body of Scandinavian Jews were present as there had been a football competition between the countries. I thought this was a terrific idea and they should be complimented, in order to keep their unique description.

    I joined in at the end to drink Kiddush wine but did not stop for the Kiddush in the main hall. As the two Israeli mentioned to me,I then walked in to see a beautifully laid out array of tables brimming with Jewish niceties. Having no one else with me and not having been noticed apart from one worshipper after the service, I decided to walk out, phone for my wife, her sister and brother in law who drove me to Oslo particularly so I could worship and leave the Scandinavians to themselves. The only real difference today with my time as a member of the congregation is that this time, a full time Rabbi is resident part of the Melchior dynasty. whereas before, a Khazan or cantor led the service assisted by an Israeli Shaliakh who also taught Hebrew and Jewish history

    As it happens, I have almost finished editing my memoirs and of course, the synagogues in Oslo and Trondheim are mentioned. Trondheim all those years ago was very friendly, while Oslo was a very frosty congregation. In Oslo, at the end of a service, I noticed some visitors, one of who was Israeli. My wife joined me and we invited them back to the house so we could show them a little of the real Norway. That is away from the city. The Israeli was very interested to learn that we had applied for immigration and were waiting for the paperwork to be finalised. Certainly, the congregation in Oslo today has carried on the practise of their fathers in ignoring visitors. I wonder how many more members this synagogue might have if they actually welcomed people to their premises.

  3. Nasus
    May 31, 2015 at 5:04 am

    wow there still doing the ignore thing, nothing has changed! They did the same to me over and over until I just said to hell with them. Never went back..they must think there are thousands of Jews in Norway. Who cares, soon the building will be empty as the idiots die off.

  4. motti
    June 1, 2015 at 2:35 pm

    When I lived in Norway, I became aware that many Jews were not members.
    Unsurprising I suppose./ I always believed it was because I was a foreigner.

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